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Sarvey Wildlife Care Center

Patient of the Week

Every day new patients arrive at our facility. In an effort to tell their story of survival and highlight the diverse number of species that we rehabilitate, we highlight a new patient each week. Some of these are individuals, others are orphaned siblings. As their cases progress - we will update the outcome - our hope is that many, many of these patients are released! 

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Orphaned Coyote Pup

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, April 30, 2018
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This coyote pup was found wandering alone in a field in Bow, WA. Sadly, he was being picked on by birds and no mother was seen. He was rescued and brought to us for care. He is doing well and eating on his own. Status: pending. 

Ducklings!

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, April 23, 2018
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We always know spring has arrived when orphaned baby ducks start coming in to the center. These two were rescued from a storm drain. They now have many more new "siblings"... our duckling nursery is filling up fast. Status: pending. 

Great Horned owlet

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, April 16, 2018
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Our resident surrogate Athena is so happy to have her first foster baby this season. This little guy was orphaned and transferred to us by our colleagues at West Sound Wildlife. Status: pending. 

Baby River Otters

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, April 9, 2018
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Three orphaned otters arrived last week. They were only two days old and sadly mom was scared off and abandoned them. They require around the clock care right now, but are getting bigger and stronger everyday. Status: pending.

 

1st Baby Squirrel

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, April 2, 2018
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Our 1st baby squirrel of the season arrived on 3/17/17. This Eastern gray squirrel fell out of a tree and was only a couple days of days old when she was brought to us. She had a swollen nose, but otherwise was healthy. She is doing well, gaining weight, and is waiting for new siblings. Status: pending. 

Rescued Red-tailed hawk

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, March 26, 2018
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On March 16th, we got a call about this poor Red-tailed hawk. She was found hanging trapped in barbed wire, by her neck. Our Clinic Manager, Jessie, went to rescue her. The hawk was really lucky as the wounds were superficial and she was mainly just tangled up by her feathers. Her recovery was quick and we were able to release her this week. You can see a video of the release hereStatus: released. 

 

Hopping into spring

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, March 19, 2018
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Eastern Cottontails have arrived, baby season has begun. Please carefully check your grass before mowing. Nests are shallow in the ground and covered by dried leaves or grass. Cover area with a laundry basket while mowing and then remove. Remember mom leaves them all day and only feeds them morning and night. Watch your dogs. These were found by a dog, but will be okay. Status: pending. 

Entangled gull

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, March 12, 2018
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This poor guy was found with not one, but three fishing hooks embedded in his wings. He was incredibly lucky that there were no serious injuries. We removed all the line and hooks and are treating the wounds for infection, but he is doing great and should be released in a few weeks. Status - pending. 

Eurasian Collared-dove

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, March 5, 2018
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She was attacked by a predator and is being treated for wounds on her neck and shoulder. She didn’t come to us immediately for care, so we are hoping the infection is not systemic. Seven days without the right care can be critical for these cases. Remember as we move into baby season, get patients to a rehabilitation center asap. Status: pending.

Red-breasted sapsucker

Posted by Sarvey Wildlife on Monday, February 26, 2018
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He was brought to us after being attacked by a cat. He was a bit disoriented, but did not suffer any serious injury. We are treating him with antibiotics.

Predation of wildlife by domestic cats is a serious problem all over the world. Some reports claim that "billions of animals are killed each year by domestic cats" - certainly this would be caused by both pets and strays.

Our records indicate that over a two year period (2016-2017) we received 533 confirmed cases of cat attacks.

PLEASE keep your cat inside, or consider installing a catio. Many species of birds are beginning to build nests - spring is around the corner. Status: released. 

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