Board Of Directors

 

Jeanne Pascal

 

 

 

 

Jeanne Pascal, BA, MS, and JD
President

Jeanne Pascal is the President of the Sarvey Wildlife Care Center Board of Directors and also the in house attorney advisor. Jeanne was born in the deep south and received her BA degree from the University of Kentucky in Lexington. She went on to get a Master’s degree in art from Indiana University in Bloomington IN combined with an education degree. Jeanne then taught art for several years in IN before moving back south to attend law school at the University of Memphis in western TN. On graduation, Jeanne moved to Washington state to practice environmental law. Jeanne went to work for the Snohomish County Prosecuting Attorney and eventually wound up at EPA where she was an Assistant Regional Counsel for approximately 10 years. In the early1990s, Jeanne transferred to the EPA Suspension and Debarment Division where she handled cases for EPA Regions 8 and 10 (CO, ND, SD, MT, Utah, WY, WA, AK, OR and ID) overseeing governmental grantees and contractors.

Jeanne rescued a backyard pine siskin in the winter of 1989 without knowing how to help it. So Jeanne, with her lifelong love of all animals great and small, called numerous wildlife places in Washington State trying to discover how to help the bird. Although it died, Kaye Baxter (founder) was the only person to return Jeanne’s call. Kaye asked Jeanne to volunteer, and Jeanne showed up at the center for the first time the next day which was on Mother’s Day,1989. Jeanne continued to volunteer cleaning cages, feeding, doing laundry, and other necessary jobs. Jeanne worked at Sarvey for approximately a year before Kaye Baxter asked her to join the Sarvey Board of Directors. Jeanne continued volunteering in the clinic for several years while on the Board. Jeanne worked with Kaye, Judy Buczek,  Bob Jones and a host of other prior volunteers and employees. While in college and law school Jeanne volunteered her time at a vet’s office, and worked closely with Virginia Knouse and PAWS when she initially came to Washington. Jeanne worked tirelessly to oppose vivisection, protect our environment and wild habitats, rescuing horses and donkeys, and in changing the laws in Washington state so that animal cruelty became (and is now) a felony. Caring for the Earth’s children on Mother’s Day was extremely meaningful and sent a powerful message to Jeanne.  Since that day, Jeanne has been continuously involved with Sarvey at some level, and with wild and domestic animals every day of her life.

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Keven McDermott

Vice President

Keven McDermott (Kev) was born in Pittsburg, PA. Her father was an army officer so the family moved frequently. She lived in Japan for three years, where she developed a love of Japanese art and culture, especially Japanese flower arrangement known as ikebana.

After her father retired from the army, the family settled in Kankakee, IL. Kev loved the small community where the neighbors all knew each other. She especially enjoyed riding her bike to the local state park where she could observe the area wildlife.

Kev was born loving animals. Her first baby toy was a stuffed dog. As a teenager she preferred dog sitting to babysitting. Since 1978 her spare time has been managed by a succession of Australian Shepherds, all of whom stole her heart.

Kev attended Lawrence University in Appleton, WI, where she majored in American Studies. Graduating from Lawrence in 1970 with a liberal arts degree, she headed to Washington D.C.

After working as a waitress for two years to pay the bills, she found a job as an investigator with the federal government. The job seemed a perfect fit as she spent her workday asking questions and resolving conflicts.

In 1974 Kev moved to Seattle to be closer to the mountains and the open spaces she loves. Over the next fifteen years she conducted personnel security investigations and equal employment investigations for two federal agencies.

In 1990 Kev landed her dream job with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Working first as a civil investigator and later managing the field investigations group, Kev embraced the agency mission – to protect human health and the environment.

Kev retired from the EPA in 2009 to spend more time with her family and to pursue her childhood dream – caring for vulnerable dogs.

In 2009 Kev joined the Old Dog Haven network of foster homes, and since then has had one or more elderly dogs in her pack. Kev seeks out the ‘throw away’ dogs that no one else wants. These dogs find their forever home with Kev and her pack, where they receive the love and care they so richly deserve.

Kev became aware of Sarvey ten years ago after she discovered a crow with a broken wing in her backyard. When the Sarvey ambulance arrived around midnight to collect the patient, she knew Sarvey had to be a very special organization. Fast forward ten years and Kev is honored to be the newest board member and looks forward to supporting the amazing work of the Sarvey Wildlife Care Center.

Eagle
                                          
Barbara Ogaard
Director

Barbara Ogaard was born and raised in Massachusetts, many moons ago to a family of commercial fishermen working out of New Bedford, Massachusetts. Eventually she left the east coast for a new life in Alaska with her husband, two children, a dog, and two cats. Finally settling in Seattle, Barbara went on to finish her college degree, obtaining a B.S. in Zoology as well as a 5th year in Ethology (animal behavior).

Over the course of her working career, she was a Ranger and Interpretive Specialist in outdoor education with the Parks and Recreation Department of Seattle, Edmonds, and Everett. In Edmonds, Barbara was a beach ranger and taught marine biology; and in Seattle Discovery Park and King County Redmond Park, she gave nature walks with emphasis on trees, plants, animals, and birds, and was head ranger at Jetty Island.

Barbara’s seasonal work with the Parks Department eventually led her to a job with North Creek Veterinary. She was interested in learning more about the medical part of caring for wildlife. When the clinic was sold and became part of Silver Lake Veterinary Clinic, Barbara met Kaye Baxter (Sarvey Wildlife founder). Kay (a client with a poodle) and Dr. Doug Yearout, DVM, and Barbara all shared an intense interest in wild animals and knew there were very few people qualified to care for injured wildlife. Thus began the Everett Wildlife Center in 1981.

Kaye went on to purchase property in Arlington and eventually the name was changed to Sarvey Wildlife Care Center. Sarvey is still located on this same property and Barbara went on to do wildlife programs for the public, schools, youth groups, and Audubon societies to raise funds for expenses.

One day someone brought in an injured bat. At the time, Barbara was the only person inoculated against rabies, so she took the little creature home. Over the next few days, Barbara was drawn to the intelligence and gentleness of the little mammal. A love affair was blooming. Puzzled by the uniqueness of the small animal, she went on to study with many bat experts and traveled the world learning about bats.

Now retired from her job as a park ranger, Barbara is specializing in the study and rehabilitation of bats. Her intense love of wildlife and animals has kept her involved with Sarvey Wildlife and she has been on the Board of Directors since 1981. Barbara still gives educational programs about bats; and when an injured bat comes into the clinic the staff call her for her expertise and experience.